PMBOK (5th Edition) Inputs, Outputs, Tools, & Techniques

Going through the various processes in the PMBOK (5th Edition), I’m realizing that what I really need to pay attention to isn’t the list of processes, but what is involved in all of them. The repetition of the inputs, tools, and techniques is not how I like to think about these things. So I’m putting together the index below. This is mostly for my reference, but I’m putting it out into the Internet in case anybody else stumbles across this in their search for information on the PMBOK (5th Edition).

pmbok-guide-5th-edition

The 66 Outputs [and where they are Inputs]:

  • Accepted deliverables: 5.5 [4.6]
  • Activity attributes: 6.2 [6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6]
  • Activity cost estimates: 7.2 [6.4, 7.3, 11.2, 12.1]
  • Activity duration estimates: 6.5 [6.6, 11.2]
  • Activity list: 6.2 [6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6]
  • Activity resource requirements: 6.4 [6.5, 6.6, 9.1, 12.1]
  • Agreements (procurement): 12.2 [12.3]
  • Approved change requests: 4.5 [4.3, 8.3, 12.3]
  • Basis of estimates: 7.2 [7.3]
  • Change log: 4.5 [13.3]
  • Change requests: 4.4, 5.5, 5.6, 6.7, 7.4, 8.2, 8.3, 9.4, 10.3, 11.6, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.4 [4.5]
  • Closed procurements: 12.4
  • Communications management plan: 10.1 [4.2, 10.2, 13.3]
  • Cost baseline: 7.3 [4.2]
  • Cost forecasts: 7.4 [4.4]
  • Cost management plan: 7.1 [4.2, 7.2, 7.3, 11.2, 11.4]
  • Deliverables: 4.3 [8.3]
  • Enterprise environmental factors updates: 9.3, 9.4
  • Final product, service, or result transition: 4.6
  • Human resource management plan: 9.1 [4.2, 7.2, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 11.2]
  • Issue log: 13.3 [9.4, 10.3, 13.4]
  • Make-or-buy decisions: 12.1 [12.2]
  • Milestone list: 6.2 [6.3]
  • Organizational process assets updates: 4.6, 5.6, 6.7, 7.4, 8.2, 8.3, 9.4, 10.2, 10.3, 11.6, 12.3, 12.4, 13.3, 13.4
  • Process improvement plan: 8.1 [4.2, 8.2]
  • Procurement documents: 12.1 [11.2, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 13.1]
  • Procurement management plan: 12.1 [4.2, 12.2]
  • Procurement statement of work: 12.1 [12.2]
  • Project calendars: 6.6 [6.7]
  • Project charter: 4.1 [4.2, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 7.1, 11.1, 13.1]
  • Project communications: 10.2 [10.3]
  • Project documents updates: 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 9.2, 9.4, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.3, 11.4, 11.5, 11.6, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4
  • Project funding requirements: 7.3 [7.4]
  • Project management plan: 4.2 [4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 5.1, 5.5, 5.6, 6.1, 6.7, 7.1, 7.4, 8.1, 8.3, 9.1, 10.1, 10.3, 11.1, 11.6, 12.1, 12.3, 12.4, 13.2, 13.4]
  • Project management plan updates: 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.6, 6.6, 6.7, 7.4, 8.2, 8.3, 9.4, 10.2, 10.3, 11.5, 11.6, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.4 [4.2]
  • Project schedule: 6.6 [6.7, 7.2, 7.3, 12.1]
  • Project schedule network diagrams: 6.3 [6.6]
  • Project scope statement: 5.3 [5.4, 6.3, 6.5, 6.6]
  • Project staff assignments: 9.2 [6.6, 9.3, 9.4]
  • Quality checklists: 8.1 [8.3]
  • Quality control measurements: 8.3 [8.2]
  • Quality management plan: 8.1 [4.2, 8.2, 11.2]
  • Quality metrics: 8.1 [8.2, 8.3]
  • Requirements documentation: 5.2 [5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 8.1, 12.1]
  • Requirements management plan: 5.1 [4.2, 5.2]
  • Requirements traceability matrix: 5.2 [5.5, 5.6]
  • Resource breakdown structure: 6.4 [6.5, 6.6]
  • Resource calendars: 9.2, 12.2 [6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 7.3, 9.3]
  • Risk register: 11.2 [6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 7.2, 7.3, 8.1, 11.3, 11.4, 11.5, 11.6, 12.1]
  • Risk management plan: 11.1 [11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 11.5]
  • Schedule baseline: 6.6 [4.2, 7.2]
  • Schedule data: 6.6 [6.7]
  • Schedule forecasts: 6.7 [4.4]
  • Schedule management plan: 6.1 [4.2, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 11.2, 11.4]
  • Scope baseline: 5.4 [4.2, 6.2, 7.3, 11.2, 11.3]
  • Scope management plan: 5.1 [4.2, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4]
  • Selected sellers: 12.2
  • Source selection criteria: 12.1 [12.2]
  • Stakeholder management plan: 13.2 [4.2, 5.2, 13.3]
  • Stakeholder register: 13.1 [5.2, 8.1, 10.1, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 13.2]
  • Team performance assessments: 9.3 [9.4]
  • Validated changes: 8.3 [4.4]
  • Verified deliverables: 8.3 [5.5]
  • Work performance data: 4.3 [5.5, 5.6, 6.7, 7.4, 8.3, 10.3, 11.6, 12.3, 13.4]
  • Work performance information: 5.5, 5.6, 6.7, 7.4, 8.3, 10.3, 11.6, 12.3, 13.4 [4.4]
  • Work performance reports: 4.4 [4.5, 9.4, 10.2, 11.6, 12.3]

Inputs that are not listed as an Output of the 47 processes:

  • Agreements (initiation) [4.1, 7.3]
  • Business case [4.1]
  • Enterprise environmental factors [4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 5.1, 5.4, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 7.1, 7.2, 8.1, 9.1, 9.2, 10.1, 10.2, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 12.1, 13.1, 13.2]
  • Organizational process assets [4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.6, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 8.1, 8.3, 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 12.1, 12.2, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3]
  • Project documents (misc or subset) [8.2, 8.3, 11.2, 12.2, 13.4]
  • Project statement of work [4.1]
  • Seller proposals [12.2]

The 118 Tools & Techniques listed for the processes (some of which are a collection of tools & techniques):

  • Acquisition [9.2]
  • Additional quality planning tools [8.1]
  • Advertising [12.2]
  • Alternative analysis [6.4]
  • Analogous estimating [6.5, 7.2]
  • Analytical techniques [4.4, 4.6, 6.1, 7.1, 11.1, 12.2, 13.2]
  • Approved change requests review [8.3]
  • Assumptions analysis [11.2]
  • Benchmarking [5.2, 8.1]
  • Bidder conference [12.2]
  • Bottom-up estimating [6.4, 7.2]
  • Change control tools [4.5]
  • Checklist analysis [11.2]
  • Claims administration [12.3]
  • Colocation [9.3]
  • Communications methods [10.1, 10.2, 13.3]
  • Communications models [10.1, 10.2]
  • Communications requirements analysis [10.1]
  • Communications technology [10.1, 10.2]
  • Conflict management [9.4]
  • Context diagrams [5.2]
  • Contract change control system [12.3]
  • Contingent response strategies [11.5]
  • Cost aggregation [7.3]
  • Cost-benefit analysis [8.1]
  • Cost of quality [7.2, 8.1]
  • Critical path method [6.6]
  • Critical chain method [6.6]
  • Decomposition [5.4, 6.2]
  • Data gathering and representation techniques [11.4]
  • Dependency determination [6.3]
  • Design of experiments [8.1]
  • Diagramming techniques [11.2]
  • Document analysis [5.2]
  • Document reviews [11.2]
  • Earned value management [7.4]
  • Expert judgment [4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 6.5, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 9.1, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 11.5, 12.1, 12.2, 13.1, 13.2, 13.4]
  • Facilitated workshops [5.2, 5.3]
  • Facilitation techniques [4.1, 4.2]
  • Focus groups [5.2]
  • Forecasting [7.4]
  • Funding limit reconciliation [7.3]
  • Ground rules [9.3]
  • Group creativity techniques [5.2]
  • Group decision-making techniques [5.2, 5.5, 6.5, 7.2]
  • Historical relationships [7.3]
  • Independent estimates [12.2]
  • Information gathering techniques [11.2]
  • Information management systems [10.2, 10.3, 13.4]
  • Inspection [5.5, 8.3]
  • Inspections and audits [12.3]
  • Interpersonal skills [9.3, 9.4, 13.3]
  • Interviews [5.2]
  • Leads and lags [6.3, 6.6, 6.7]
  • Make-or-buy analysis [12.1]
  • Management skills [13.3]
  • Market research [12.1]
  • Meetings [4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 5.1, 6.1, 7.1, 8.1, 9.1, 10.1, 10.3, 11.1, 11.6, 12.1, 13.1, 13.2, 13.4]
  • Modeling techniques [6.6, 6.7]
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis [9.2]
  • Negotiation [9.2]
  • Networking [9.1]
  • Observation and Conversation [9.4]
  • Observations [5.2]
  • Organization charts and position descriptions [9.1]
  • Organizational theory [9.1]
  • Parametric estimating [6.5, 7.2]
  • Payment systems [12.3]
  • Performance reporting [10.2, 12.3]
  • Performance reviews [6.6, 7.4]
  • Personnel assessment tools [9.3]
  • Pre-assignment [9.2]
  • Precedence diagramming method (PDM) [6.3]
  • Probability and impact matrix [11.3]
  • Process analysis [8.2]
  • Procurement audits [12.4]
  • Procurement negotiations [12.2, 12.4]
  • Procurement performance review [12.3]
  • Product analysis [5.3]
  • Project management information system [4.3, 4.4]
  • Project management software [6.4, 6.7, 7.2, 7.4]
  • Project performance appraisals [9.4]
  • Proposal evaluation techniques [12.2]
  • Prototypes [5.2]
  • Published estimating data [6.4]
  • Quality audits [8.2]
  • Quality management and control tools [8.2]
  • Quantitative risk analysis and modeling techniques [11.4]
  • Questionnaires and surveys [5.2]
  • Recognition and rewards [9.3]
  • Records management system [12.3, 12.4]
  • Reserve analysis [6.5, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 11.6]
  • Resource optimization techniques [6.6, 6.7]
  • Risk audits [11.6]
  • Risk categorization [11.3]
  • Risk data quality assessment [11.3]
  • Risk probability and impact assessment [11.3]
  • Risk reassessment [11.6]
  • Risk urgency assessment [11.3]
  • Rolling wave planning [6.2]
  • Schedule compression [6.6, 6.7]
  • Schedule network analysis [6.6]
  • Scheduling tool [6.6, 6.7]
  • Seven basic quality tools [8.1, 8.3]
  • Stakeholder analysis [13.1]
  • Statistical sampling [8.1, 8.3]
  • Strategies for negative risks or threats [11.5]
  • Strategies for positive risks or opportunities [11.5]
  • SWOT analysis [11.2]
  • Team-building activities [9.3]
  • Technical performance measurement [11.6]
  • Three-point estimating [6.5, 7.2]
  • To-complete performance index (TCPI) [7.4]
  • Training [9.3]
  • Variance analysis [5.6]
  • Variance and trend analysis [11.6]
  • Vendor bid analysis [7.2]
  • Virtual teams [9.2]

This is just a tad overwhelming.

PMBOK (5th Edition) Inputs, Outputs, Tools, & Techniques

5 thoughts on “PMBOK (5th Edition) Inputs, Outputs, Tools, & Techniques

  1. Indeed a tad overwhelming. Are you taking the exam for your current job? Will it open up the potential for promotion within your current company? Tell us about the typical uses for this certification once obtained.

  2. The exam and certificate align with my current work and are good for my career. For better or worse, the PMP is a requirement (or “highly desirable”) for many project manager positions. It’s not so much that you “use” the certification, but rather that it says something about your competence to manage projects. I do believe, however, I will be a better project team member and manager for having gained greater knowledge regarding the project management body of knowledge.

  3. Ben Butina says:

    How well does PMBOK align with agile methodology? Seems like it’s better suited to a waterfall approach.

  4. It is far more suited to waterfall. Honestly, it would be great for building a physical bridge. It’s not so great for software. Many of the principles are sound for any sort of project, but the PMBOK certainly feels more at home in a waterfall world. I was just discussing this with Ken Furlong. I think I may post comparing operations, waterfall, and Agile.

  5. Ben Butina says:

    I was part of an agile team about ten years ago and I really liked the approach. The daily scrums were particularly helpful.

    Looking forward to the follow-up post.

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